Make Tech Her Story

Despite playing a key role in the growth of IT, women’s representation in the industry has stagnated. Some argue women simply are not as interested in IT careers as men – but we know it’s not that simple. To understand the deeper reasons behind the IT industry’s gender gap, CompTIA commissioned research that brought the conversation directly to girls and boys in middle and high school. While having these conversations, we kept an iconic image in mind, Rosie the Riveter.

Reimagining Rosie

In the 1940s, Rosie the Riveter served as an icon of female empowerment. Today, her iconic spirit can galvanize us to create a more inclusive IT industry - but she’s due for a modern reimagining. How do you envision Rosie? Create your own Rosie avatar and share on social media with #MakeTechHerStory to help show girls everywhere that anyone - regardless of gender, race, or age - can work in IT.

Reimagining Rosie

In the 1940s, Rosie the Riveter served as an icon of female empowerment. Today, her iconic spirit can galvanize us to create a more inclusive IT industry—but she’s due for a modern reimagining. How do you envision Rosie? Create your own Rosie avatar and share on social media with #MakeTechHerStory to help show girls everywhere that anyone - regardless of gender, race, or age - can work in IT.

Bringing girls into the conversation

We talked to girls between the ages of 10 and 17 about technology, careers, and what an IT professional looks like. Here’s what they said.

Learn more and get involved

As a parent or guardian, you don’t need to work in IT to encourage your daughter’s interest in a tech-focused career. Turn to CompTIA’s Get into IT report for IT career motivation you can share with your kids.

For teachers and other educational professionals, volunteering to teach a TechGirlz workshop is a great way to educate and inspire the next generation of women in tech.

And if you work in IT, CompTIA’s Dream IT program provides a platform to embolden girls to become leaders in tech.

Download the E-Book

Why have only 23 percent of girls considered an IT career? And how can parents, educators and IT professionals encourage girls in tech? Download CompTIA’s full e-book to learn more about how we can all make tech her story.

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About the campaign

CompTIA’s study, conducted in conjunction with the Blackstone Group between June and July 2016, involved qualitative and quantitative research into girls’ and boys’ personal technology habits and perceptions of IT careers. Qualitative research was conducted through a series of focus groups with middle school and high school girls, while quantitative findings are based on a nationwide survey of boys and girls between the ages of 10 and 17.

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